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Marten - Martes americana

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Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S4

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:
FWP Conservation Tier: 2


 

External Links





 
General Description
This house cat-sized animal is distinctly weasel-like in appearance. Has short legs, prominent ears, pointed face, and a well-furred tail constituting one-third of its total length. Stiff glossy guard hairs with dense silky under-fur. The soft, dense, yellowish-brown fur shades to dark brown on its bushy tail and legs. Pale buff to orange patch on throat and breast. Has ability to rotate hind limbs to enable descending trees headfirst. Total length: 21 to 26 inches. Weight: 1.5 to 2.75 pounds.

Diagnostic Characteristics
Mink has white patch on chin. Fisher is larger, dark brown with grizzled head and back. Red Fox has white tip on tail.

General Distribution
Montana Range

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Western Hemisphere Range

 


Summary of Observations Submitted for Montana
Number of Observations: 2521

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

 

(Records associated with a range of dates are excluded from time charts)



Migration
Non-migratory.

Habitat
Primarily a boreal animal preferring mature conifer or mixed wood forests. Severe forest disturbance can significantly reduce habitat value. Uses deadfall and snags as den sites. In Glacier National Park, most often located in mesic spruce and subalpine fir types. Stands averaged 35% canopy cover. Martens often traveled along forest cover/open area ecotones. Maternity dens in rock outcrops, tree cavities (O'Neill 1980, Burnett 1981).

Ecological Systems Associated with this Species
  • Details on Creation and Suggested Uses and Limitations
    How Associations Were Made
    We associated the use and habitat quality (high, medium, or low) of each of the 82 ecological systems mapped in Montana for vertebrate animal species that regularly breed, overwinter, or migrate through the state by:
    1. Using personal observations and reviewing literature that summarize the breeding, overwintering, or migratory habitat requirements of each species (Dobkin 1992, Hart et al. 1998, Hutto and Young 1999, Maxell 2000, Foresman 2001, Adams 2003, and Werner et al. 2004);
    2. Evaluating structural characteristics and distribution of each ecological system relative to the species’ range and habitat requirements;
    3. Examining the observation records for each species in the state-wide point database associated with each ecological system;
    4. Calculating the percentage of observations associated with each ecological system relative to the percent of Montana covered by each ecological system to get a measure of “observations versus availability of habitat”.
    Species that breed in Montana were only evaluated for breeding habitat use, species that only overwinter in Montana were only evaluated for overwintering habitat use, and species that only migrate through Montana were only evaluated for migratory habitat use.  In general, species were associated as using an ecological system if structural characteristics of used habitat documented in the literature were present in the ecological system or large numbers of point observations were associated with the ecological system.  However, species were not associated with an ecological system if there was no support in the literature for use of structural characteristics in an ecological system, even if point observations were associated with that system.  High, medium, and low habitat quality was assigned based on the degree to which the structural characteristics of an ecological system matched the preferred structural habitat characteristics for each species in the literature.  The percentage of observations associated with each ecological system relative to the percent of Montana covered by each ecological system was also used to guide assignments of habitat quality.  If you have any questions or comments on species associations with ecological systems, please contact Bryce Maxell at bmaxell@mt.gov or (406) 444-3655.

    Suggested Uses and Limitations
    Species associations with ecological systems should be used to generate potential lists of species that may occupy broader landscapes for the purposes of landscape-level planning.  These potential lists of species should not be used in place of documented occurrences of species (this information can be requested at: http://mtnhp.org/requests/default.asp) or systematic surveys for species and evaluations of habitat at a local site level by trained biologists.  Users of this information should be aware that the land cover data used to generate species associations is based on imagery from the late 1990s and early 2000s and was only intended to be used at broader landscape scales.  Land cover mapping accuracy is particularly problematic when the systems occur as small patches or where the land cover types have been altered over the past decade.  Thus, particular caution should be used when using the associations in assessments of smaller areas (e.g., evaluations of public land survey sections).  Finally, although a species may be associated with a particular ecological system within its known geographic range, portions of that ecological system may occur outside of the species’ known geographic range.

    Literature Cited
    • Adams, R.A.  2003.  Bats of the Rocky Mountain West; natural history, ecology, and conservation.  Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado.  289 p.
    • Dobkin, D. S.  1992.  Neotropical migrant land birds in the Northern Rockies and Great Plains. USDA Forest Service, Northern Region. Publication No. R1-93-34.  Missoula, MT.
    • Foresman, K.R.  2001.  The wild mammals of Montana.  Special Publication No. 12.  Lawrence, KS: The American Society of Mammalogists.  278 p.
    • Hart, M.M., W.A. Williams, P.C. Thornton, K.P. McLaughlin, C.M. Tobalske, B.A. Maxell, D.P. Hendricks, C.R. Peterson, and R.L. Redmond. 1998.  Montana atlas of terrestrial vertebrates.  Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.  1302 p.
    • Hutto, R.L. and J.S. Young.  1999.  Habitat relationships of landbirds in the Northern Region, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station RMRS-GTR-32.  72 p.
    • Maxell, B.A.  2000.  Management of Montana’s amphibians: a review of factors that may present a risk to population viability and accounts on the identification, distribution, taxonomy, habitat use, natural history, and the status and conservation of individual species.  Report to U.S. Forest Service Region 1.  Missoula, MT: Wildlife Biology Program, University of Montana.  161 p.
    • Werner, J.K., B.A. Maxell, P. Hendricks, and D. Flath.  2004.  Amphibians and reptiles of Montana.  Missoula, MT: Mountain Press Publishing Company. 262 p.

Food Habits
Eats a variety of animal and plant materials associated with the mature forest. Is an opportunistic feeder that primarily feeds on a variety of small mammals. Meadow Voles and Red-backed Voles were staples in Glacier National Park. Also used Cricetidae, jumping mice, shrews, and ground squirrels. Use of birds, insects, and fruit variable by season. Will use snowshoe hares (O'Neill 1980).

Ecology
Populations fluctuate in response to prey availability, juvenile dispersal, and mortality of adult females. Average home range for adult male = 2.9 sq km, female = 0.7 sq km, resident juveniles = 0.7 sq km (Burnett 1981).

Reproductive Characteristics
Mates during summer with young born during April. Exhibits delayed implantation and an eight- to nine-month gestation. Average litter size is two to four. Breeds in July and August. Implantation occured February 22 and April 10. Parturition 25 to 28 days after implantation. Delayed implantation period of 8 months. Gestation of 9 months.

References
  • Additional ReferencesLegend:   View WorldCat Record   View Online Publication
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    • Banci, V. 1994. Wolverine. Pp. 99-127. IN: Ruggiero, L. F., K. B. Aubry, S. W. Buskirk, L. J. Lyon, amd W. J. Zielinski (eds.), The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores, American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States. U.S.D.A, Forest Serv. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Exper. Stat. Gen. Tech. Report RM-254. 184 pp.
    • Bennett, L.A. 1984. Marten ecology and habitat management in the Central Rocky Mountains. Colorado Coop Wildlife Res. Unit.
    • Berg, W. E. 1982. Reintroduction of fisher, pine marten, and river otter. Pages 159-173 in G. C. Sanderson, editor. Midwest furbearer management. Proc. Symp. 43rd Midwest Fishand Widlife Conference, Wichita, Kansas.
    • Burnett, G. W. 1981. Movements and habitat use of American marten in Glacier National Park, Montana. M.S. thesis. Univ. Mont., Missoula. 130 pp.
    • Burnett, G. W. 1980. Ecological study of American pine marten. Pp. 43-44 in K. L. McArthur ed., 1979 Annual Research Summary, Unpubl. Rep., USDI National Park Service, Glacier National Park, MT. 54 pp.
    • Burnett, G. W. 1981. Movements and habitat use of American marten in Glacier National Park, Montana. M.S. thesis, University of Montana, Missoula. 130 pp.
    • Buskirk, S. W. 1992. Conserving circumboreal forests for martens and fishers. Cons. Biol. 6:318-320.
    • Buskirk, S.W., S.C. Forrest, and M.G. Raphael. 1989. Winter resting site ecology of marten in the central Rocky Mountains. J. Wildl. Manage. 53: 191-196.
    • Chapman, J. A., and G. A. Feldhamer, editors. 1982. Wild mammals of North America: biology, management, and economics. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland.
    • Clark, T. W., E. Anderson, and M. Strickland 1987. MARTES AMERICANA. Mamm. Species 289:1-8.
    • Clark, T.W., T.M. Campbell, III, and T.N. Hauptman. 1989. Demographic characteristics of American marten populations in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. Great Basin Nat. 49:587-596.
    • Coffin, K. 1992. The distribution of marten prey species in southwest Montana. P. 67 in G. L. Dusek, comp., Proc. Montana Chap., The Wildl. Soc., Whitefish.
    • Coffin, K.W. 1994. Population characteristics and winter habitat selection by pine marten in southwest Montana. Thesis. Bozeman, Montana: Montana State University. 94 p.
    • Cross, James, and Richard P. Weckwerth, 1977, Upland Game Bird (and Fur Survey) Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-8, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1976 - June 30, 1977.
    • Cross, James, and Richard P. Weckwerth, 1978, Upland Game Bird (and Fur Survey) Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-9, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1977 - June 30, 1978.
    • Cross, James, and Richard P. Weckwerth, 1982, Upland Game Bird (and Fur Survey) Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-13, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1981 - June 30, 1982.
    • Cross, James, and Richard P. Weckwerth, 1983, Upland Game Bird (and Fur Survey) Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-14, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1982 - June 30, 1983.
    • Fager, C. 1991. Harvest dynamics for marten in southwest Montana. In K. Aune, comp., Proc. Montana Chap., The Wildl. Soc., Bozeman.
    • Fager, C. W. 1991. Harvest dynamics and winter habitat use of the pine marten in southwest Montana. M.S. thesis. Montana State University, Bozeman. 73 pp.
    • Flathead National Forest. U.S. Forest Service., 1993, Wildlife landscape evaluation, Swan Valley. Draft Report.
    • Foresman, K. R. 2001. The wild mammals of Montana. American Society of Mammologists, Special Publication Number 12. Lawrence, KS. 278 p.
    • Frisina, M., K. AU, K. Aune and H. Hash. 1991. Montana's pine marten management program. Pine Marten Symposium, University of Wyoming, Laramie. (Abstract)
    • Greer, K. R. 1955. Mink age and sex ratios. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Quarterly Rep. April-June: 148-170.
    • Hagmeier, E. M. 1956. Distribution of marten and fisher in North America. Can. Field-Nat. 70:149-168.
    • Hawley, V. D. 1955. Ecology of the marten in Glacier National Park. M.S. thesis, University of Montana, Missoula. 131 pp.
    • Hawley, V. D. 1959. Marten ecology. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Compl. Rep., Proj. W-49-R-7:68-73.
    • Hawley, V. D. 1960. Marten population studies. Montana Fish and Game Department P-R Job Compl. Rep. Proj. W-49-R-8:43-55.
    • Hawley, V. D. and F. S. Newby. 1957. Marten home ranges and population fluctuctions. J. Mammal. 38(2):174-184.
    • Hoffmann, R. S. and D. L. Pattie. 1968. A guide to Montana mammals: identification, habitat, distribution, and abundance. University of Montana, Missoula. 133 p.
    • Jonkel, C. J. 1959. An ecological and physiological study of pine marten. M.S. thesis. Montana State Univ., Missoula. 81 pp.
    • Jonkel, C. J. 1963. Sexual maturity and implantation of blastocysts in the wild pine marten. Journal of Wildlife Management 27(1):93-98.
    • Koehler, G.M. and M.G. Hornocker. 1977. Fire effects on marten habitat in the Selway-Bitterroot Wilderness. J. Wildl. Manage. 41(3):500-505.
    • Koehler, G.M., J.A. Blakesley, and T.W. Koehler. 1990. Marten use of successional forest stages during winter in north-central Washington. NW.Nat. 71:1-4.
    • Kujala, Q. 1992. Habitat selection by radio-collared marten in southwest Montana. P. 66 in G. L. Dusek, comp., Proc. Montana Chap., The Wildl. Soc., Whitefish.
    • Kujala, Quentin J., 1993, Winter habitat selection and population status of pine marten in southwest Montana. W-100-R-4-6, V, FB-1, Sub-project no. 1, 2, Job no. 3. Statewide Wildlife Program. Furbearers and Predators. Furbearers. Management Surveys and iIvestigations, Research and Technical Services. Pine marten populations and habitat relationships in southwest Montana. June 16, 1993.
    • Maj, M., and E. O. Garten. 1994. Fisher, lynx, wolverine: Summary of distribution information. Pp. 169-175. IN: Ruggiero, L. F., K. B. Aubry, S. W. Buskirk, L. J. Lyon, amd W. J. Zielinski (eds.), The scientific basis for conserving forest carnivores, American marten, fisher, lynx, and wolverine in the western United States. U.S.D.A, Forest Serv. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Exper. Stat. Gen. Tech. Report RM-254. 184 pp.
    • Marshall, W. H. 1946. Winter food habits of the pine marten in Montana. J. Mammal. 27:83-84.
    • Montana Dept. of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 1985, Upland Game Bird and Furbearer Survey and Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-16, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1984 - June 30, 1985.
    • Montana Dept. of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 1986, Upland Game Bird and Furbearer Survey and Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-17, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1985 - June 30, 1986.
    • Montana Dept. of Fish, Wildlife & Parks, 1987, Upland Game Bird and Furbearer Survey and Inventory. Wildlife Investigations, Region One. W-130- R-18, Job No. II-1, July 1, 1986 - June 30, 1987.
    • Newby, F. E. 1952. Marten in Montana. Montana Wildl. Autumn.
    • Newby, F. E. 1955. Marten ecology. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Job Compl. Rep. Proj. W-49-R-4, VI(l and 2).
    • Newby, F. E. 1958. Marten population status. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Job Compl. Rep. Proj. W-49-R-7:56-67.
    • Newby, F. E., and V. D. Hawley. 1954. Progress on a marten live-trapping study. Trans. N. Am. Wildl. Conf. 19:452-462.
    • Newby, F. E., R. Weckwerth and V. Hawley. 1956. Marten ecology. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Job Compl. Rep. Proj. W-49R- 5, Job II-I.
    • O'Neal, Thomas, 1980. Pine marten maternal den observations. The Murrelet 61(3):102-103.
    • Pattie, D. L. and N. A. M. Verbeek. 1967. Alpine mammals of the Beartooth Plateau. Northwest Science 41(3): 110-117.
    • Peterson, Joel, and Michael R. Frisina, 1985, II Upland Game Bird Survey and Inventory, Region Three, Game Birds and Fur (Small Game) Survey and Inventory. Statewide Wildlife Survey and Inventory. W-130- R-16, Job No. II-3, July 1, 1984 - June 30, 1985.
    • Peterson, Joel, and Michael R. Frisina, 1986, II Upland Game Bird Survey and Inventory, Region Three, Game Birds and Fur (Small Game) Survey and Inventory. Statewide Wildlife Survey and Inventory. W-130- R-17, Job No. II-3, July 1, 1985 - June 30, 1986.
    • Peterson, Joel, and Michael R. Frisina, 1987, II Upland Game Bird and Inventory, Region Three, Game Birds and Fur (Small Game) Survey and Inventory. Statewide Wildlife Survey and Inventory. W-130- R-18, Job No. II-3, July 1, 1986 - June 30, 1987.
    • Raine, R.M. 1987. Winter food habits and foraging behavior of fishers (Martes pennanti) and martens (Martes americana) in southeastern Manitoba. Can. J. Zool. 65: 745-747.
    • Raine, R.M. 1983. Winter habitat use and responses to snow cover of fisher (Martes pennanti) and marten (Martes americana) in southeastern Manitoba. Can. J. Zool. 61:25-34.
    • Reid, F. 2006. Peterson Field Guide to Mammals of North America, 4th Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company: Boston and New York, 608 pp.
    • Rust, H. J. 1946. Mammals of northern Idaho. J. Mammal. 27(4): 308-327.
    • Spencer, W. D. 1987. Seasonal rest-site preferences of pine martens in the northern Sierra Nevada. J. Wildl. Manage. 51:616-621.
    • Spencer, W. D., and W. J. Zielinski. 1983. Predatory behavior of pine martens. J. Mammal. 64:715-717.
    • Spencer,W.D., R.H. Barrett, and W.J. Zielinski. 1983. Marten habitat preferences in the northern Sierra Nevada. The Journal of Wildlife Management. 47(4): 1181-1186.
    • Stearns-Roger Inc., 1975, Environmental baseline information of the Mount Vernon Region, Montana. January 31, 1975.
    • Steventon, J. D. and J. T. Major. 1982. Marten use of habitat in a commercially clear-cut forest. J. Wildl. Manage. 46(1):175-182.
    • Thompson, Richard W., Western Resource Dev. Corp., Boulder, CO., 1996, Wildlife baseline report for the Montana [Montanore] Project, Lincoln and Sanders counties, Montana. In Application for a Hard Rock Operating Permit and Proposed Plan of Operation, Montanore Project, Lincoln and Sanders Counties, Montana. Vol. 5. Stroiazzo, John. Noranda Minerals Corp., Libby, MT. Revised September 1996.
    • Thompson, W.K. 1949. A study of marten in Montana. Proc. West. Assoc. State Game and Fish Comm. 29:181-188.
    • TVX Mineral Hill Mine, Amerikanuak, Inc., Gardiner, MT., 2002, Yearly summary of wildlife observation reports. 1990-2002 Letter reports.
    • Weckwerth, R. P. 1957. The relationship between the marten population and the abundance of small mammals in Glacier National Park. M.S. thesis. University of Montana, Missoula. 76 pp.
    • Weckwerth, R. P. and V. D. Hawley. 1962. Marten food habits and population fluctuations in Montana. J. Wildl. Manage. 26(1): 55-74.
    • Wright, P. L. 1953. Intergradation between MARTES AMERICANA and MARTES CAURINA in western Montana. J. Mamm. 34:74-86.
    • Zielinski, W.J., W.D. Spencer, and R.H. Barrett. 1983. Relationship between food habits and activity patterns of pine martens. J. Mammal. 64:387-396.
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Citation for data on this website:
Marten — Martes americana.  Montana Field Guide.  Montana Natural Heritage Program and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.  Retrieved on October 22, 2014, from http://FieldGuide.mt.gov/speciesDetail.aspx?elcode=AMAJF01010
 
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