Search Field Guide
Advanced Search
MT Gov Logo
Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Sand Dropseed - Sporobolus cryptandrus

Native Species

Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S4S5
C-value: 4


Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:


 

External Links






 
General Description
Perennial. Stems 20–80 cm. Leaves: blades 2–5 mm wide; throat with a conspicuous tuft of whitish hairs. Inflorescence a contracted to open panicle 8–20 cm long, partially enclosed in leaf sheath. Spikelets 2–2.5 mm long. Lemmas 1.4–2.5 mm long (Lavin in Lesica et al. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Sand Dropseed - Sporobolus cryptandrus
*Habit: Perennial.
*Panicle: Contracted (appressed), greater than 4 centimeters long, and much longer than wide and enclosed in an arcuate leaf sheath.
*Stem: Base is erect.
*Spikelets: 2.5 mm or shorter. Both glumes are not as long or longer than the lemma.

Small Dropseed - Sporobolus neglectus, SOC
*Habit: Annual.
*Panicle: Contracted (narrow), less than 4 cm long, and usually partially enclosed by the leaf sheath.
*Spikelets: 2-3 mm long.

Tall Dropseed - Sporobolus compositus, SOC
*Habit: Perennial.
*Panicle: Contracted (appressed), but much longer than wide and usually partially enclosed in the leaf sheath.
*Stem: Base is erect.
*Spikelets: 3 mm or more long. Both glumes are not as long or longer than the lemma.

Alkali Dropseed - Sporobolus airoides
*Habit: Perennial.
*Panicle: Diffuse, greater than 4 centimeters long, and about as long as wide and usually fully exerted from the leaf sheath.
*Stem: Base is decumbent.
*Spikelets: 2-2.5 mm long.

Prairie Dropseed - Sporobolus heterolepis, not documented in Montana
*Habit: Perennial.
*Panicle: Open, greater than 4 centimeters long, and much longer than wide and usually entirely exerted from the leaf sheath.
*Spikelets: At least one of the glumes is as long or longer than the lemma.

Species Range
Montana Range

Year-round
 


Range Comments
Throughout most of North America (Lavin in Lesica et al. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Observations in Montana Natural Heritage Program Database
Number of Observations: 202

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Habitat
Occurring in disturbed settings and rarely in sagebrush steppe, common along roadsides and there conspicuous because of inflorescences each enclosed in an arcuate leaf sheath (Lavin in Lesica et al. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

References
  • Literature Cited AboveLegend:   View Online Publication
    • Lesica, P., M.T. Lavin, and P.F. Stickney. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. Fort Worth, TX: BRIT Press. viii + 771 p.
  • Additional ReferencesLegend:   View Online Publication
    Do you know of a citation we're missing?
    • Anderson, N.L. 1951. Field studies on the biology of range grasshoppers of southeastern Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, Montana: Montana State University. 96 p.
    • Anderson, N.L. 1962. Grasshopper-vegetation relationships on Montana grasslands. Ph.D Dissertation. Bozeman, Montana: Montana State University. 73 p.
    • Boggs, K. W. 1984. Succession in riparian communities of the lower Yellowstone River, Montana. M.S. Thesis. Montana State University, Bozeman, 107 pp.
    • Brey, C.W. 1998. Epidemiology of wheat curl mite (Aceria tosichella K.) and wheat streak mosaic virus on feral grass species and effect of glyphosate on wheat curl mite dispersal. Ph.D. Dissertation. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 136 p.
    • Eggers, M.J.S. 2005. Riparian vegetation of the Montana Yellowstone and cattle grazing impacts thereon. M.Sc. Thesis. Montana State University, Bozeman, MT. 125 p.
    • Flora of North America Editorial Committee. 2003. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 25. Magnoliophyta: Commelinidae (in part): Poaceae, part 2. Oxford Univ. Press, New York. xxv + 781 pp.
    • Fritzen, D.E. 1995. Ecology and behavior of Mule Deer on the Rosebud Coal Mine, Montana. Ph.D. Dissertation. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 143 p.
    • Haile, K.F. 2011. Fuel load and heat effects on Northern mixed prairie and four prominent rangeland graminoids. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 71 p.
    • Harvey, S.J. 1990. Responses of steppe plants to gradients of water soil texture and disturbance in Montana, U.S.A. Ph.D. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 34 p.
    • Johnson, J.D. 2004. Restoring native species to crested wheatgrass dominated rangelands. M.Sc.Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 58 p.
    • Meier, G.A. 1997. The colonization of Montana roadsides by native and exotic plants. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 45 p.
    • Quire, R.L. 2013. The sagebrush steppe of Montana and southeastern Idaho shows evidence of high native plant diversity, stability, and resistance to the detrimental effects of nonnative plant species. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 124 p.
    • Rundquist, V.M. 1973. Avian ecology on stock ponds in two vegetational types in north-central Montana. Ph.D. Dissertation. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 112 p.
    • Seipel, T.F. 2006. Plant species diversity in the sagebrush steppe of Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 87 p.
    • Skilbred, Chester L. 1979. Plant succession on five naturally revegetated strip-mined deposits at Colstrip, Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 128 pp.
    • Skinner, K.F. 1995. Plant and grasshopper community composition: indicators & interactions across three spatial scales. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 144 p.
  • Web Search Engines for Articles on "Sand Dropseed"
Login Logout
Citation for data on this website:
Sand Dropseed — Sporobolus cryptandrus.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from