Search Field Guide
Advanced Search
MT Gov Logo
Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Sticky Cinquefoil - Drymocallis glandulosa
Other Names:  Potentilla glandulosa, Drymocallis pseudorupestris, Drymocallis glabrata

Native Species

Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S4

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:
MNPS Threat Rank:
C-value: 6

External Links






 
General Description
Perennial from a mostly branched caudex. Stems erect to ascending, hirsute and glandular-pubescent, 10–70 cm. Leaf blades oblanceolate, pinnately divided into 5 to 7 obovate to suborbicular, glandular, dentate leaflets, 6–60 mm long. Inflorescence a glandular cyme with spreading to ascending branches. Flowers: sepals lanceolate, 4–7 mm long; bracteoles shorter than the sepals; petals 5–10 mm long. Achenes smooth, <1 mm long.

Lesica (2012) treats this species in Drymocallis and indicates three subspecies for Montana: subsp. glabrata (Rydb.) Sojak;
subsp. glandulosa; and subsp. pseudorupestris (Rydb.) Sojak (Lesica 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Diagnostic Characteristics
In general, species of Drymocallis and Potentilla can be difficult to identify across their specific ranges because many characteristics are continuous. Variation comes from localized ecotypes, polyploidy genes, hybridization, asexual reproduction without fertilization (apomixis), and/or other sources.

Drymocallis glandulosa - Sticky Cinquefoil
*Basal leaflets typically with 2-5 leaflet pairs.
*Stem leaves typically with 1-4 leaflet pairs.
*Relatively smaller flowers that open widely when compared to Drymocallis fissa.
*Relatively open inflorescence and ascending to spreading lateral branches when compared to Drymocallis arguta
*Anthers 1 mm or less long.

Drymocallis arguta - Tall Cinquefoil
*Basal leaves typically with 2-5 leaflet pairs.
*Stem leaves typically with 1-4 leaflet pairs.
*May have somewhat smaller flowers that open widely when compared to Drymocallis fissa.
*Relatively congested inflorescence and lateral branches that are erect or strongly ascending when compared to Drymocallis arguta
*Anthers 1 mm or less long.

Drymocallis fissa - Big-flower Cinquefoil, NOT documented in Montana.
Plants have all of the following characteristics:
*Basal leaves with relatively numerous leaflets (usually 5-6 leaflet pairs), often with additional small ones;
*Stem leaves with 4-6 pairs of leaflets.
*Stem leaves typically with 4-6 leaflet pairs.
*Inflorescence is congested to more-or-less open.
*Large flowers that also open widely;
*Large, elongated anthers, 1-1.4 mm; and
*Thick styles, about 1 mm wide.

Range Comments
BC, MT, south to CA, AZ, UT and Mexico (Lesica 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Observations in Montana Natural Heritage Program Database
Number of Observations: 783

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Habitat
Rocky soil of open forest, grasslands, meadows, outcrops; valleys to alpine (Lesica 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

References
  • Literature Cited AboveLegend:   View Online Publication
    • Flora of North America Editorial Committee, eds. (FNA). 2014. Flora of North America North of Mexico. Vol. 9. Magnoliophyta: Picramniaceae to Rosaceae. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, Inc. 752 pp.
    • Lesica, P., M.T. Lavin, and P.F. Stickney. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. Fort Worth, TX: BRIT Press. viii + 771 p.
  • Additional ReferencesLegend:   View Online Publication
    Do you know of a citation we're missing?
    • Aho, Ken Andrew. 2006. Alpine and Cliff Ecosystems in the North-Central Rocky Mountains. Ph.D. Dissertation. Bozeman, Montana: Montana State University. 343 p.
    • Ament, R.J. 1995. Pioneer Plant Communities Five Years After the 1988 Yellowstone Fires. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 216 p.
    • Clark, D. 1991. The effect of fire on Yellowstone ecosystem seed banks. M.Sc. Thesis. Montana State University, Bozeman. 115 pp.
    • Culver, D.R. 1994. Floristic analysis of the Centennial Region, Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Montana State University, Bozeman. 199 pp.
    • Dale, D. 1973. Effects of trail use under forests in the Madison Range, Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 96 pp.
    • Eversman, S.T. 1968. A comparison of plant communities and substrates of avalanche and non-avalanche areas in south central Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 39 pp.
    • Johnson, T. W. 1982. An analysis of pack and saddle stock grazing areas in the Bob Marshall Wilderness. M.Sc.Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 105 p.
    • Jones, W. W. 1901. Preliminary flora of Gallatin County. M.S. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State College. 78 pp.
    • Martinka, R.R. 1970. Structural characteristics and ecological relationships of male blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus (Say)) territories in southwestern Montana. Ph.D Dissertation. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 73 p.
    • Quire, R.L. 2013. The sagebrush steppe of Montana and southeastern Idaho shows evidence of high native plant diversity, stability, and resistance to the detrimental effects of nonnative plant species. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 124 p.
    • Saunders, J.K., Jr. 1954. A two-year investigation of the food habits and range use of the Rocky Mountain goat in the Crazy Mountains, Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 22 p.
    • Seipel, T.F. 2006. Plant species diversity in the sagebrush steppe of Montana. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 87 p.
    • Simanonok, M. 2018. Plant-pollinator network assembly after wildfire. Ph.D. Dissertation. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 123 p.
  • Web Search Engines for Articles on "Sticky Cinquefoil"
Login Logout
Citation for data on this website:
Sticky Cinquefoil — Drymocallis glandulosa.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from