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Globe-podded Whitetop - Lepidium appelianum
Other Names:  Globe-pod Hoarycress, Hairy Whitetop, Long-stalk Hoary-cress, Cardaria pubescens

Non-native Species

Global Rank: GNR
State Rank: SNA

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:
MNPS Threat Rank:
C-value: 0

External Links






 
General Description
Rhizomatous perennial. Stems ascending to erect, 20–45 cm. Basal leaves lanceolate, 3–6 cm long, dentate. Stem leaves auriculate-clasping. Vestiture of sparse to dense, simple hairs. Flowers white; petals 2–4 mm long; stamens 6. Fruit obovoid, pubescent, rounded at the base, 2–4 mm long, not notched; style 0.5–1 mm long; pedicels 4–11 mm long, glabrous (Lesica 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Diagnostic Characteristics
There are many white-flowered species in the Mustard Family, both native and exotic. It is recommended that identifications be made using a plant manual designed for Montana. Mustards have flowers with 4 sepals, 4 petals, and 6 stamens (4 long and 2 short) among other characteristics.

Globe-podded WhitetopLepidium appelianum, exotic:
* White-flowered plants that grow from creeping roots (rhizomes) and have mature silicles (fruits) that are not notched at their tip.
* Silicles are pubescent (have hairs), inflated (globe-shaped), and with a short style of 0.4-1.0 mm long. Silicle stems (pedicels) are 4-11 mm long.
* Stem leaves are auriculate (lobed like an arrow) and clasping around the stem.

Perennial PepperweedLepidium latifolium, exotic and Noxious:
* White-flowered plants that grow from creeping roots (rhizomes) and have mature silicles (fruits) that are not notched at their tip.
* Silicles are glabrous or sparsely pilose (long soft hairs) with a very short style of 0.1 mm long or less. Silicle stems (pedicels) are 2-5 mm long.
* Stem leaves are sessile, but do not clasp around the stem.

WhitetopLepidium draba, exotic and Noxious:
* White-flowered plants that grow from creeping roots (rhizomes) and have mature silicles (fruits) that are not notched at their tip.
* Silicles are glabrous (lack hairs), flattened, and their base is cordate (heart-shaped or indented). Silicles are tipped with a style of 1-1.5 mm long. Silicle stems (pedicels) are 5-12 mm long.
* Stem leaves are auriculate (lobed like an arrow) and clasping around the stem.

Lenspod WhitetopLepidium chalepense, exotic:
* White-flowered plants that grow from creeping roots (rhizomes) and have mature silicles (fruits) that are not notched at their tip.
* Silicles are glabrous (lack hairs), partially inflated and round (compressed-globose), not cordate (is pointed to its stem), and topped with a style 1-2 mm long. Silicle stems (pedicels) are 8-15 mm long.
* Stem leaves are auriculate (lobed like an arrow) and clasping around the stem.

The other Montana Lepidium species (using MTNHP preferred name) have mature silicles with a notch of at least 0.1 mm deep at their top and are not rhizomatous.

Hoary False-alyssumBerteroa incana, exotic and Noxious:
* White-flowered, annual plants that grow from taproots and have mature silicles (fruits) that are not notched at their tip.
* Each of the 4 petals are notched, making the flower appear 8-petaled.
* Plants have star-shaped hairs; whereas, Lepidium species have simple hairs or none.
* Stem leaves are widest near their tip (oblanceolate), sessile on the stem, and point upwards.

Field PennycressThlaspi arvense, exotic:
* Easily differentiated if in fruit and easily confused with other species if only of leaves.
* White-flowered, annual plants that grow from taproots and have mature silicles (fruits) that are large, deeply notched at their tip, flat, and with wide wings, resembling a penny.
* Lower stem leaves have petioles. Upper stem leaves are sessile, clasping, auriculate (lobed like an arrow), and with smooth to toothed margins.

Common YarrowAchillea millifolium, native and desirable:
* Member of the Aster/Sunflower Family.
* Bright-white flowers arranged closely in a flat-topped inflorescence.
* Leaves are 2-3 times pinnately dissected, appearing fern-like or bushy like a squirrel’s tail.

Sources: Jacobs and Mangold 2007; FNA 2010; Graves-Medley and Mangold 2011; Lesica et al. 2012.

Species Range
Montana Range

Non-native
 


Range Comments
Introduced throughout temperate North America; native to Asia (Lesica 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. BRIT Press. Fort Worth, TX).

Observations in Montana Natural Heritage Program Database
Number of Observations: 36

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Habitat

References
  • Additional ReferencesLegend:   View Online Publication
    Do you know of a citation we're missing?
    • Lesica, P., M.T. Lavin, and P.F. Stickney. 2012. Manual of Montana Vascular Plants. Fort Worth, TX: BRIT Press. viii + 771 p.
    • Rens, E.N. 2003. Geographical analysis of the distribution and spread of invasive plants in the Gardiner Basin, MT. M.Sc. Thesis. Bozeman, MT: Montana State University. 100 p.
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Citation for data on this website:
Globe-podded Whitetop — Lepidium appelianum.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from