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Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Oreas Anglewing - Polygonia oreas


Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S5

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General Description
[From Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001; Pyle 2002] Forewing 2.3-2.9 cm. The most ragged and lobed wing margin of the Polygonia. uppersurface of forewing with large spot in posterior basal region (in 2nd cubitus cell), upper surface of hindwing with dark border the same color on both sides of enclosed hindwing pale submarginal band of yellowish chevrons; undersurface blackish-gray, usually two-toned (lighter on the outer half), undersurface of hindwing with a sharply-angled white "L" near outer edge of darker basal half.

Phenology
One flight; late July overwintering to early June (Scott 1986). Late June to September (Glassberg 2001); late June to mid-September in Oregon (Warren 2005); late February to mid-September with peaks in May and July-September in Oregon and Washington (Pyle 2002).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Confusing; best determined by combination of uppersurface of forewing with large spot in posterior basal region (in 2nd cubitus cell), uppersurface of hindwing with dark border the same color on both sides of enclosed hindwing pale submarginal band of yellowish chevrons, undersurface hindwing with a sharply-angled white "L" near outer edge of darker basal half.

Species Range
Montana Range

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Range Comments
Southern British Columbia south in the Pacific US to central California, south in the Rocky Mountain states through Idaho, western Montana, and extreme northwestern Wyoming, an isolated population throughout much of western Colorado (Scott 1986; Glassberg 2001; Guppy and Shepard 2001); to 1525 m elevation in Oregon (Warren 2005). In Montana, reported from many counties in the western half of the state (Kohler 1980; Stanford and Opler 1993).

Summary of Observations Submitted for Montana
Number of Observations: 4

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Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Migration
Non-migratory.

Habitat
Forest edges, moist woodland clearings, montane meadows, along streams (Glassberg 2001; Pyle 2002). Habitat in Montana not described but probably similar.

Food Habits
Larval food plants include several species of Ribes (Scott 1986, 1992; Pyle 2002; Warren 2005; James and Nunnallee 2011). Adults feed on flower nectar (including Anaphalis, Chrysothamnus, Ribes), sap, dung, carrion, rotting fruit, and mud (Pyle 2002; James and Nunnallee 2011; Scott 2014).

Reproductive Characteristics
Females lay eggs singly usually on undersurface of host plant leaves (Scott 1986, 1992). Larvae grow rapidly (depending on temperature), from L1 instar to L5 instar and pupation in 16-19 days, another 9-12 days for adults to eclose (emerge from pupae). Larvae nocturnal, solitary, rest on undersides of leaves within leaf folds tied with silk to form nest, sometimes involve multiple leaves in nest, pupate within final leaf nest or suspended in open, overwinters as adult (James and Nunnallee 2011). Males perch on shrubs and small trees (sometimes 3 m above ground) in valley bottoms awaiting passing females (Scott 1975b, 1986; James and Nunnallee 2011).

References
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Citation for data on this website:
Oreas Anglewing — Polygonia oreas.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from