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Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Aphrodite Fritillary - Speyeria aphrodite


Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S5

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:


 

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General Description
[From Ferris and Brown 1981, Scott 1986, Glassberg 2001, Guppy and Shepard 2001] Forewing 2.6-3.7 cm. A large to mid-sized fritillary with variable markings; upper wing surfaces bright reddish brown with many black markings; ventral hindwing brown to reddish brown extending beyond the postmedian silver-white spots (spots lacking in some from Bears Paw Mountains); eyes dull yellow-green; presence of a dark spot along the inner trailing margin of dorsal forewing; males lack black swollen areas along dorsal forewing veins; ventral hindwing of both sexes between veins M3 and CuA1 with postmedian black spot always surrounded by a faint black circle or halo.

Phenology
One flight: adults fly from late June to mid-September (Scott 1986, Guppy and Shepard 2001).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Combination of dull yellow-green eyes; presence of a dark spot along the inner trailing margin of dorsal forewing; males lack of black swollen areas along dorsal forewing veins; ventral hindwing of both sexes between veins M3 and CuA1 with postmedian black spot always surrounded by a faint black circle or halo should help differentiate this species.

Species Range
Montana Range

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Range Comments
From British Columbia east to Nova Scotia, south in the west to Arizona and New Mexico, south in the east along Appalachian Mountains to Georgia (Scott 1986, Guppy and Shepard 2001). Considered common (Glassberg 2001). Uncommon in Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (Debinski and Pritchard 2002).

Summary of Observations Submitted for Montana
Number of Observations: 2

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Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Migration
Mostly non-migratory, but rare migrants occur in central Great Plains (Scott 1986).

Habitat
Lower elevation native prairie grassland, shrub-steppe, open woods, mesic montane and aspen parkland meadows (Scott 1986, Guppy and Shepard 2001). Mesic meadows in Glacier National Park (Debinski 1993).

Food Habits
Larval foodplants include several species of Viola. Adults feed on flower nectar (Scott 1986, Guppy and Shepard 2001).

Reproductive Characteristics
Females may lay eggs in late June through July, but usually in mid-August. Larvae hatch from eggs laid singly at base of the food plant or nearby (often under shrubs); first instar larvae (L1) overwinter; larvae do not produce nests, instead begin feeding the following spring once food plant has leafed out. Adult males patrol all day mostly in open areas in search of females (Scott 1986, Guppy and Shepard 2001).

References
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Citation for data on this website:
Aphrodite Fritillary — Speyeria aphrodite.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from