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Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Banded Hairstreak - Satyrium calanus


Global Rank: G5
State Rank: SNR

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General Description
[From Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001] Forewing 1.4-1.6 cm. Hindwing double-tailed, the anterior tail very short. Uppersurface mostly brown with distinct reddish spot near anal angle of hindwing. Undersurface brown to gray, postmedian line of elongate and almost continuous dark dashes with white outside edges, hindwing with submarginal reddish-orange spots, the blue tail spot not capped with orange.

Phenology
One flight; late April to early June in the south, July to mid-August in the north and mountains (Scott 1986). Mainly April to early June in Texas, late June to early August in Colorado, July to mid-August in South Dakota and Saskatchewan (Glassberg 2001). Late June to late August in Colorado (Scott and Scott 1978; Ferris and Brown 1981).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Probably best determined by the undersurface brown to gray, postmedian line of elongate and almost continuous dark dashes with white outside edges, hindwing with submarginal reddish-orange spots, the blue tail spot not capped with orange.

Species Range
Montana Range

Click the legend blocks above to view individual ranges.
 


Range Comments
Southern Canada and eastern US south to the Gulf states, west to the Dakotas, eastern Nebraska and Kansas, Oklahoma and eastern Texas, also in Colorado, northern New Mexico, extreme eastern ond southern Wyoming (Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001); 1783 m to 2926 m elevation in Colorado (Brown 1957; Scott and Scott 1978). In Montana, not reported prior to 2004 (Kohler 1980; Stanford and Opler 1993; FLMNH Lepidopterists' Society database); since reported from Carter County in the extreme southeastern corner of the state.

Migration
Non-migratory.

Habitat
Oak brush and groves along plains rivers, open fields and glades in or near oak woodlands (Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001). In Montana, reported from the only area in the state where native oak (burr oak, Quercus macrocarpa) occurs (FLMNH Lepidopterists' Society database).

Food Habits
Larval food plants include Acer, Carya, Castanea, Fraxinus, Juglans, Malus, several species of Quercus (the primary host), possibly Prunus (Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986, 1992, 2006). Adults feed on flower nectar (including Apocynum, Asclepias, Ceanothus, Centaurea, Cirsium, Heracleum, Melilotus, Pastinaca, Rudbeckia, Rhus, Solidago) and tree sap (Tooker et al. 2002; Scott 2014).

Reproductive Characteristics
Females lay eggs on host plant twigs; overwinter in egg stage. Larvae eat catkins and holes in leaves, build no nest (Scott 1979, 1986). Males perch on small shrubs or other objects throughout the day, often in gullies or small clearings but sometimes hilltops to await passing females (Scott 1975b, 1986).

References
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Citation for data on this website:
Banded Hairstreak — Satyrium calanus.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from