Search Field Guide
Advanced Search
Montana Animal Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Sharp-tailed Grouse - Tympanuchus phasianellus

Google for more images Google for web pages
Species of Concern

Global Rank: G5
State Rank: S1,S4
* (see State Rank Reason below)

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:
FWP Conservation Tier: 3
PIF: 2


 

External Links






Listen to an Audio Sample

Copyright by: The Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, NY, all rights reserved.
State Rank Reason (see State Rank above)
Populations west of the Continental Divide are a Species of Concern with a state rank of S1. Populations east of the Continental Divide have a state rank of S4 and are not a Species of Concern.
 
General Description
Sexes are similar, although males have inconspicuous yellow eye combs and pale violet air sacs on the neck. Both sexes have feathered legs and upper parts mottled with white, buff, brown, and black. The wings have conspicuous white spots, and the breast and flanks have V-shaped brown markings on a snow-white background. Adult males and females average from 16.5 to 18.5 inches in length; adult males average 33 ounces and adult females 29 ounces in weight. Populations west of the Continental Divide that are thought to have been extirpated were, until recently, believed to be a smaller subspecies, the Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). These populations tended to have grayer plumage, more pronounced spotting on the throat, and narrower markings on the underparts (Hoffman and Thomas 2007). However, nuclear and mitochondrial DNA of populations east and west of the Continental Divide overlap almost completely, indicating that Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse likely never inhabited western Montana and that the declines observed in that region were in populations genetically similar to those on the Great Plains (Spaulding et al. 2006; Wood et al. 2010).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Female Ring-necked Pheasants, especially in the early fall, can be confused with Sharp-tailed Grouse. Sharp-tailed Grouse, however, have much shorter tails, feathered legs, and white bellies (female Ring-necked Pheasants are mottled brown throughout).

Species Range
Montana Range

Click the legend blocks above to view individual ranges.

Western Hemisphere Range

 


Summary of Observations Submitted for Montana
Number of Observations: 2729

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

Breeding
(direct evidence "B")


Breeding
(indirect evidence "b")


No evidence of Breeding
(transient "t")


Overwintering
(regular observations "W")


Overwintering
(at least one obs. "w")



 

(Records associated with a range of dates are excluded from time charts)



Migration
Move to breeding grounds in mid-March to mid-April, nested from mid-May to mid-June, reared broods from June to September, and moved to wintering areas from mid-October to mid-December.

Habitat
The habitat is primarily grasslands interspersed with shrub and brush-filled coulees. They prefer stands of inter-mixed tree and shrub grasslands. With high population, they spread into islands of native grassland, usually along drainages surrounded by grainfields. Sharp-tailed Grouse persist only on native bunchgrass-shrub stands. In Idaho, Saab and Marks (1992) found birds selected big sage habitat types during summer. They appeared to prefer range habitats that were in good condition.

Until recently, Sharp-tailed Grouse in Montana were found west of the Continental Divide in larger mountain valleys with extensive native bunchgrass-shrub stands. However, they have now apparently been extirpated, or nearly extirpated, from this historic range (Hoffman and Thomas 2007).



Ecological Systems Associated with this Species
  • Details on Creation and Suggested Uses and Limitations
    How Associations Were Made
    We associated the use and habitat quality (high, medium, or low) of each of the 82 ecological systems mapped in Montana for vertebrate animal species that regularly breed, overwinter, or migrate through the state by:
    1. Using personal observations and reviewing literature that summarize the breeding, overwintering, or migratory habitat requirements of each species (Dobkin 1992, Hart et al. 1998, Hutto and Young 1999, Maxell 2000, Foresman 2001, Adams 2003, and Werner et al. 2004);
    2. Evaluating structural characteristics and distribution of each ecological system relative to the species’ range and habitat requirements;
    3. Examining the observation records for each species in the state-wide point database associated with each ecological system;
    4. Calculating the percentage of observations associated with each ecological system relative to the percent of Montana covered by each ecological system to get a measure of “observations versus availability of habitat”.
    Species that breed in Montana were only evaluated for breeding habitat use, species that only overwinter in Montana were only evaluated for overwintering habitat use, and species that only migrate through Montana were only evaluated for migratory habitat use.  In general, species were associated as using an ecological system if structural characteristics of used habitat documented in the literature were present in the ecological system or large numbers of point observations were associated with the ecological system.  However, species were not associated with an ecological system if there was no support in the literature for use of structural characteristics in an ecological system, even if point observations were associated with that system.  High, medium, and low habitat quality was assigned based on the degree to which the structural characteristics of an ecological system matched the preferred structural habitat characteristics for each species in the literature.  The percentage of observations associated with each ecological system relative to the percent of Montana covered by each ecological system was also used to guide assignments of habitat quality.  If you have any questions or comments on species associations with ecological systems, please contact Bryce Maxell at bmaxell@mt.gov or (406) 444-3655.

    Suggested Uses and Limitations
    Species associations with ecological systems should be used to generate potential lists of species that may occupy broader landscapes for the purposes of landscape-level planning.  These potential lists of species should not be used in place of documented occurrences of species (this information can be requested at: http://mtnhp.org/requests/default.asp) or systematic surveys for species and evaluations of habitat at a local site level by trained biologists.  Users of this information should be aware that the land cover data used to generate species associations is based on imagery from the late 1990s and early 2000s and was only intended to be used at broader landscape scales.  Land cover mapping accuracy is particularly problematic when the systems occur as small patches or where the land cover types have been altered over the past decade.  Thus, particular caution should be used when using the associations in assessments of smaller areas (e.g., evaluations of public land survey sections).  Finally, although a species may be associated with a particular ecological system within its known geographic range, portions of that ecological system may occur outside of the species’ known geographic range.

    Literature Cited
    • Adams, R.A.  2003.  Bats of the Rocky Mountain West; natural history, ecology, and conservation.  Boulder, CO: University Press of Colorado.  289 p.
    • Dobkin, D. S.  1992.  Neotropical migrant land birds in the Northern Rockies and Great Plains. USDA Forest Service, Northern Region. Publication No. R1-93-34.  Missoula, MT.
    • Foresman, K.R.  2001.  The wild mammals of Montana.  Special Publication No. 12.  Lawrence, KS: The American Society of Mammalogists.  278 p.
    • Hart, M.M., W.A. Williams, P.C. Thornton, K.P. McLaughlin, C.M. Tobalske, B.A. Maxell, D.P. Hendricks, C.R. Peterson, and R.L. Redmond. 1998.  Montana atlas of terrestrial vertebrates.  Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit, University of Montana, Missoula, MT.  1302 p.
    • Hutto, R.L. and J.S. Young.  1999.  Habitat relationships of landbirds in the Northern Region, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station RMRS-GTR-32.  72 p.
    • Maxell, B.A.  2000.  Management of Montana’s amphibians: a review of factors that may present a risk to population viability and accounts on the identification, distribution, taxonomy, habitat use, natural history, and the status and conservation of individual species.  Report to U.S. Forest Service Region 1.  Missoula, MT: Wildlife Biology Program, University of Montana.  161 p.
    • Werner, J.K., B.A. Maxell, P. Hendricks, and D. Flath.  2004.  Amphibians and reptiles of Montana.  Missoula, MT: Mountain Press Publishing Company. 262 p.

Food Habits
Diet consists of seeds, grasses, fruit, and insects.

Ecology
Farming and intense grazing eliminate native grasses required for shelter, protection from predators, night roosting and spring nesting; dense trees and shrubs are needed for food, rest, escape, cover and winter survival.

In western Montana, housing developments and agriculture have eliminated large portions of habitat required for shelter, protection from predators, night roosting and spring nesting; dense trees and shrubs are needed for food, rest, escape, cover, and winter survival.


Reproductive Characteristics
Nesting occurs from mid-May to mid-June (Davis 1961). Displays were observed as early as April 3 (Skaar 1969) in the Gallatin Valley. The number of birds seen on dancing grounds in the Tobacco Plains near Eureka has varied from a high of 33 (1971) to a low of 4 in 1988. During 1990 and 1991, birds were supplemented with a transplant from British Columbia and reached a population of nearly 30 in 1991 (Bown 1980, Cope 1992).

References
  • Literature Cited AboveLegend:   View WorldCat Record   View Online Publication
    • Bown, R.R. 1980. The status of the Columbian sharp-tailed grouse in the Tobacco Plains, Eureka, Montana. B.S. Thesis. University of Montana, Missoula. 42 pp.
    • Cope, M. G. 1992. Distribution, habitat selection and survival of transplanted Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) in the Tobacco Valley, Montana. M.S. thesis. Montana State University. 60 pp.
    • Davis, C.V. 1961. A distributional study of the birds of Montana. Ph.D. dissertation. Oregon State University, Corvallis. 462 pp.
    • Hoffman, R. W. and A. E. Thomas. 2007. Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus): a technical conservation assessment. August 17, 2007. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region. 131 pp. Accessed January 10, 2012.
    • Saab, V. A. and J. S. Marks. 1992. Summer habitat use by Columbian sharp-tailed grouse in western Idaho. Great Basin Naturalist 52:166-173.
    • Skaar, P.D. 1969. Birds of the Bozeman latilong: a compilation of data concerning the birds which occur between 45 and 46 N. latitude and 111 and 112 W. longitude, with current lists for Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, impinging Montana counties and Yellowstone National Park. Bozeman, MT. 132 p.
    • Spaulding, A. W., K. E. Mock, M. A. Schroeder, and K. I. Warheit. 2006. Recency, range expansion, and unsorted lineages: implications for interpreting neutral genetic variation in the sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus). Molecular Ecology 15(9): 2317-2332.
    • Wood, A. K., B. D. Deeble, D. M. Becker, K. I. Warheit, and C. A. Dean. 2010. Subspecific identification of sharp-tailed grouse (Tymphanuchus phasianellus) samples from Montana. Proceedings of the 27th Western Agencies Sage and Columbian Sharp-tailed Grouse Workshop. Twin Falls, ID. June 7-10, 2010.
  • Additional ReferencesLegend:   View WorldCat Record   View Online Publication
    Do you know of a citation we're missing?
    • Aldrich, J. W. 1963. Geographic Distribution of American Tetraonidae. J. Wildl. Manage. 27:529-545.
    • American Ornithologists' Union. 1998. Check-list of North American birds. 7th edition. American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, D.C. 829 pp.
    • Anonymous. 1959. Sharp-tail grouse. Montana Wildlife. Novemher.
    • Bergeron, D., C. Jones, D.L. Genter, and D. Sullivan. 1992. P. D. Skaar's Montana Bird Distribution, Fourth Edition. Special Publication No. 2. Montana Natural Heritage Program, Helena. 116 pp.
    • Brown, R. L. 1960-66. Sharp-tailed grouse population study. Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Job CompI. Rep. Proj. W-91-R-l through 9, Job II-E.
    • Brown, R. L. 1961. Effects of land use practices on sharp-tailed grouse. Mont. Dept. of Fish and Game, Helena. Job CompI. Rep./Investigations Proj. 12 pp.
    • Brown, R. L. 1961. Sharp-tailed grouse population study (in the Cannonball study area). Montana Dept. of Fish and Game, Helena. Proj. No. W-91-R-3, Job No. II-E. 33 pp.
    • Brown, R. L. 1965. Techniques developed and employed in a study of female sharptail grouse ecology in Montana during 1963, 1964, and 1965. Presented at 4th biennial meeting of Western States Sage Grouse Comm., Walden, CO., June 22-24, 1965.
    • Brown, R. L. 1966. Response of sharp-tail breeding populations to annual changes in residual grassland cover. MT Fish and Game Dept. Fed. Aid Proj. W-91-R.
    • Brown, R. L. 1968. Effects of land-use practices on sharp-tail grouse. State of MT, Proj. No. W-91-R-9.
    • Brown, R. L. 1968. Sharptail grouse population study. Montana Dept. of Fish and Game. Job Compl. Rep., Proj. No. W-91-R-9, Job No. n-E. 18 pp.
    • Brown, R.L. 1971. Sharp-tailed grouse. pp. 129-133 in Mussehl, T.W., and F.W. Howell (eds.), Game Management in Montana--. Montana Department of Fish and Game, Helena. 238 pp.
    • Camp Dresser & McKee, Inc., 1990, Stillwater Chromite Project Baseline Data Report: Hydrology and Wildlife Monitoring, Hydrology - November 1988 through November 1989, Wildlife - November 1988 through February 1990. June 30, 1990
    • Connelly, J. W., M. W. Gratson, and K. P. Reese. 1998. Sharp-tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). Species Account Number 354. The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca, NY: Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology; Retrieved 3/25/2008 from The Birds of North America Online database
    • Decker Coal Company., 1992, Decker Coal Company East Pit Permit. Vol. 7. Section 9 - Wildlife. Section 10 - AVF and Prime Farmland. July 1992.
    • Ecological Consulting Service (ECON), Helena, MT., 1972, Wildlife Investigations: 10 x 20 Mile Area, Colstrip, Montana. Project 9--01--A. Annual Report to Montana Power Company and Western Energy Company; December 1972 - December 1973. December 21, 1973.
    • Ecological Consulting Service (ECON), Helena, MT., 1973, Wildlife Investigations: Areas A & B, Colstrip, Montana. Project 1--01--A. Annual Report to Montana Power Company and Western Energy Company; December 1972 - December 1973. December 21, 1973.
    • Ecological Consulting Service (ECON), Helena, MT., 1973, Wildlife Investigations: Areas D & E, Colstrip, Montana. Project 13--01--A. Annual Report to Montana Power Company and Western Energy Company; December 1972 - December 1973. December 21, 1973.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service Div.), Helena, MT., 1977, Sharp-tailed grouse research, 1977. Proj. 176-81-A. December 31, 1977.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1975, Colstrip 10 x 20 Area wildlife and wildlife habitat annual monitoring report, 1975. Proj. 71-23-A. December 31, 1975.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1976, Colstrip 10 x 20 Area wildlife and wildlife habitat annual monitoring report, 1976. Proj. 135-85-A. December 31, 1976.
    • Econ, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1977, 1977 wildlife and wildlife habitat monitoring study, Peabody Coal Company Big Sky Mine. Proj. 161-85-A. November 30, 1977.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1977, Colstrip 10 x 20 Area wildlife and wildlife habitat annual monitoring report, 1977. Proj. 164-85-A. December 31, 1977.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1977, Sharp-tailed grouse research. Report No. 2. 1976.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1979, Annual wildllife report of the Colstrip Area for 1978. Proj. 195-85-A. April 6, 1979.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1979, Annual wildllife report of the Colstrip Area for 1979, including a special raptor research study. Proj. 216-85-A. March 1, 1980.
    • ECON, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1979, Area B four-section wildlife report. August 3, 1979.
    • ECS, Inc. (Ecological Consulting Service), Helena, MT., 1975, Sharp-tailed grouse research. Progress Report
    • Ehrlich, P., D. Dobkin, and D. Wheye. 1988. The birder’s handbook: a field guide to the natural history of North American birds. Simon and Schuster Inc. New York. 785 pp.
    • Eng, R. L. 1952. Range and distribution of prairie grouse species (sharp-tailed). Montana Fish and Game Dept. P-R Quarterly Report, April-June:95-99.
    • Eng, R. L. 1971. Two hybrid sage grouse X sharp-tailed grouse from central Montana. Condor 73:491-493.
    • Evans, K. E. 1968. CHARACTERISTICS AND HABITAT REQUIREMENTS OF THE GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKEN AND SHARP-TAILED GROUSE - A REVIEW OF LITERATURE. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Exp. Sta., CONSERVATION RESEARCH REPORT 12. 32 pp.
    • Farmer, P. J. 1980. Sharp-tailed grouse telemetry study, Pearl Area, Montana, 1979. Tech. Rpt. for Shell Oil Co. by Westech, Inc. Helena, MT.
    • Gniadek, Steve. 1983. Southwest Glendive Wildlife Baseline Inventory. BLM, Miles City District. 56pp with appendices.
    • Grensten, J. J. 1987. Locating sharp-tailed grouse leks from color infrared photography. BLM Technical Note 377, BLM, Denver CO 80225-0047. 8 pp.
    • Gunderson, P. T. 1989. 1988 sharp-tailed grouse production in the Missouri River Breaks. In M. Aderhold, comp., The effects of the 1988 drought and fires on wildlife, Proc. Mont.Chapt., The Wildl. Soc., Missoula.
    • Gunderson, P. T. 1990. Nesting and brood rearing ecology of sharp-tailed grouse on the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Montana. M.S. thesis, Montana State University, Bozeman. 86 pp.
    • Hand, R.L. 1969. A distributional checklist of the birds of western Montana. Unpublished report. 55 pp.
    • Hoag, A. W., and C. E. Braun. 1990. Status and distribution of plains sharp-tailed grouse in Colorado Prairie Nat. 22(2): 97-102.
    • Johnsgard, P. A. 1973. Grouse and quail of North America. U. of Nebraska, Lincoln. 553 pp.
    • Johnsgard, P. A. 1992. Birds of the Rocky Mountains with particular reference to national parks in the northern Rocky Mountain region. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. xi + 504 pp.
    • Kantrud, H. A. 1981. Grazing intensity effects on the breeding avifauna of North Dakota native grasslands. Can. Field-Nat. 95:404-417.
    • Kantrud, H.A. and R.L. Kologiski. 1982. Effects of soils and grazing on breeding birds of uncultivated upland grasslands of the northern Great Plains. U.S.D.I., Fish and Wildl. Serv., Wildl. Res. Rep. 15. 33 pp.
    • Landel, H. F. 1988. A study of female mating behavior and female mate choice in the sharptailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus jamesi). Ph.D. thesis, Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 192 pp.
    • Landel, Hans Frederick., 1988, A Study of female and male mating behaviour and female mate choice in the sharp-tailed grouse, Tympanuchus phasianellus jamesi. December 1988.
    • Lenard, S., J. Carlson, J. Ellis, C. Jones, and C. Tilly. 2003. P. D. Skaar's Montana Bird Distribution, 6th Edition. Montana Audubon: Helena, MT, 144 pp.
    • McEwen, L. C., and R. L. Brown. 1964. Acute toxicity of dieldrin and malathion to sharp-tailed grouse in the field. Central Plains and Mountain States Sec. Meeting, The Wildl. Soc. 2 pp.
    • McEwen, L. C., and R. L. Brown. 1966. Acute toxicity of dieldrin and malathion to wild Sharp-tailed Grouse. Journal of Wildlife Management 30:604-611.
    • Meridian Minerals Co., 1990, Meridian Minerals Company Bull Mountains Mine No. 1 Permit Application, Musselshell County, Montana. Vol. 7 of 14: Section 26.4.304(10): Text. January 31, 1990.
    • Montana Bird Distribution Committee. 2012. P.D. Skaar's Montana bird distribution. 7th Edition. Montana Audubon, Helena, Montana. 208 pp. + foldout map.
    • Montana Dept. of State Lands. U.S. Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement., 1988, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Peabody Coal Company's Big Sky Area B Mine, Rosebud County, Montana; July 1988.
    • Nielsen, L. S. 1978. The effects of rest-rotation grazing on the distribution of sharp-tailed grouse. M.S. Thesis, Montana State University.
    • Nielsen, L. S. and C. A. Yde. 1981(?). The effects of rest-rotation grazing on the distribution of sharp-tailed grouse. Montana Agriculture Exp. Sta., Journal Series No. 1195. pp. 147-165.
    • Northrup, R. D. 1991. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat use during fall and winter on the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Montana. M.S. thesis, Montana State University, Bozeman. 54 pp.
    • Peabody Coal Company, Flagstaff, AZ., 1991, Wildlife monitoring report: 1990 field season, Big Sky Mine. July 1991.
    • Powder River Eagle Studies, Inc., Gillette, WY., 1999, Spring Creek Mine 1998 Wildlife Monitoring. March 1999.
    • Prose, B.L. 1987. Habitat suitability index models: plains sharp-tailed grouse. U. S. Fish Wildl. Serv. Biol. Rep. 82(10.142). 31 pp.
    • Schladweiler, Philip, and John P. Weigand., 1983, Relationships of endrin and other chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds to wildlife in Montana, 1981-1982. September 1983.
    • Schwarzkoph, W. F. 1976. Sharp-tailed grouse research report no. 2 for the Montana Power Company. 36 pp.
    • Schwarzkoph, W. F., R. R. Austin, and L. R. Reichelt. 1975. Sharp-tailed grouse research progress report for the Montana Power Company. 24 pp.
    • Swenson, J. E. 1985. Seasonal habitat use by sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) on mixed-grass prairie in Montana. Can. Field-Nat. 99:40-46.
    • Swenson, J. E., and R. L. Eng. 1984. Autumn we,ights of Plains sharp-tailed grouse in Montana. Prairie Nat. 16:49-54.
    • Thunderbird Wildlife Consulting, Inc., Gillette, WY., 2003, Spring Creek Mine 2002 Wildlife Monitoring. March 2003.
    • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service., 1984, Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Montana: Draft Environmental Impact Statement.
    • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service., 1985, Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Montana: Final Environmental Impact Statement.
    • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1980. Management of Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge. Draft. REPRINT
    • U.S. Forest Service. 1991. Forest and rangeland birds of the United States: Natural history and habitat use. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Agricultural Handbook 688. 625 pages.
    • Waage, B. C. 1989. Sharp-tailed grouse lek (dancing ground) establishment on reclaimed mined lands. Pp. 116-122 in: Proceedings IV: Issues and technology in the mangement of impacted wildlife, February 6-8, 1989. Thorne Ecological Institute, Glenwood Springs, Colorado.
    • Waage, B. C. 1992. Sharp-tailed grouse use of reclaimed mine lands in Eastern Montana. Pp. 160-168 in Am. Soc. Surface Mining and Reclam., Duluth, Minn.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1987, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1987 Field Season. December 1987.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1988, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1988 Field Season. December 1988.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1989, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1989 Field Season. December 1989.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1991, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1990 Field Season. September 1991.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1992, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1991 Field Season. December 1992.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1993, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; 1992 Field Season. December 1993.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1993, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; 1993 Field Season. April 1993.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1995, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana:1994 Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; December 1, 1993 - November 30, 1994. February 27, 1995.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1998, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: 1997 Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; December 1, 1996 - November 30, 1997 Survey Period. March 23, 1998.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 1999, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: 1998 Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; December 1, 1997 - November 30, 1998 Survey Period. February 24, 1999.
    • Waage, Bruce C., 2002, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana. 2001 Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report; December 1, 2000 - November 30, 2001. Febr. 26, 2002.
    • Waage, Bruce C., compiler., 1984, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Rosebud County, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1983 Field Season. June 1984.
    • Waage, Bruce C., compiler., 1985, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Rosebud County, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1984 Field Season. October 1985.
    • Waage, Bruce C., compiler., 1986, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Rosebud County, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1985 Field Season. December 1986.
    • Waage, Bruce C., compiler., 1986, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Rosebud County, Montana: Annual Wildlife Monitoring Report, 1986 Field Season. December 1986.
    • Westech Environmental Services, Inc., 2003, Wildlife monitoring: Absaloka Mine area, 2002. April 2003
    • Western Energy Co., Colstrip, MT. Unpub., 1983, Western Energy Company's Application for Amendment to Surface Mining Permit NO. 8003, Area B: sections 7, 8, 17,18 T1N R41E, sections 12, 13 T1N R40E, Mining Expansion. March 1983.
    • Western Energy Co., Colstrip, MT., 1980, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Report, 1980.
    • Western Energy Co., Colstrip, MT., 1981, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Report, 1981.
    • Western Energy Co., Colstrip, MT., 1981, Western Energy Company's Application for a Surface Mining Permit: Area C - Block 1. Vol. 1. May 1981.
    • Western Energy Co., Colstrip, MT., 1982, Western Energy Company Rosebud Mine, Colstrip, Montana: Annual Wildlife Report, 1982.
    • Western Technology and Eng., Inc., 1991, Wildlife resources of the Little Rocky Mountains Environmental Study Area. March 1991. In Application for Amendment to Operating Permit No. 00096, Zortman Mining, Inc., Phillips County, Montana. Vol. 3. Jan. 3, 1995.
    • Westmoreland Resources, Inc., 1992, Mining and Reclamation Plan for Absaloka Mine. Book G. Wildlife. Vol. 2. Exhibit G-17. 1991 Wildlife Report. Wildlife monitoring and additional baseline inventory: Absaloka Mine Area (Western Technology and Engineering, Inc. [WESTECH], 1992).
    • Westmoreland Resources, Inc., Hardin, MT., 1983, 1980 Wildlife Monitoring Report. 12/21/79-12/20-80.
    • Wood, Marilyn A., and Tim Manley, 1993, Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Program Habitat Protection. Advance Design: Appendices G, H, I, J. October 1993.
    • Yde, C. A. 1977. The distribution and movements of sharp-tailed grouse during spring and summer in relation to rest-rotation grazing. M.S. thesis, Montana State University, Bozeman. 70 pp.
  • Web Search Engines for Articles on "Sharp-tailed Grouse"
Login Logout
Citation for data on this website:
Sharp-tailed Grouse — Tympanuchus phasianellus.  Montana Field Guide.  Montana Natural Heritage Program and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.  Retrieved on November 27, 2014, from http://FieldGuide.mt.gov/speciesDetail.aspx?elcode=ABNLC13030
 
There are currently 16 active users in the Montana Field Guide.