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Montana Field Guide

Montana Field Guides

Striped Sallfly - Triznaka signata


Global Rank: G5
State Rank: SNR

Agency Status
USFWS:
USFS:
BLM:


 

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General Description
This small, yellow-green stonefly is represented by the "Yellow Sally" dry fly for fly fisherman. It lives on the cobbles of streams and rivers for one year before emerging in the late spring or summer.

Diagnostic Characteristics
Triznaka adults can be distinguished from other
Nearctic Chloroperlinae by the combination of the distinctive dark marking of the head and pronotum, presence of a ventral hammer on sternum 7 in males, a blunt, thick epiproct tip and the absence of rods and downy appendages on the aedeagus (Gaufin et al., 1972).

Range Comments
Global Range: (less than 2,500,000 square km (greater than 1,000,000 square miles)). It occurs in the Coast, Cascade, and Rocky Mountains from New Mexico northward to Alaska and Yukon (Stewart and Oswood, 2006). In Montana, this species is reported to be widespread across the western portion of the state from about Big Timber westward.

Summary of Observations Submitted for Montana
Number of Observations: 4

(Click on the following maps and charts to see full sized version) Map Help and Descriptions
Relative Density

Recency

 

(Observations spanning multiple months or years are excluded from time charts)



Habitat
This species occurs in creeks and rivers (Gaufin et al., 1972). We have reports from small streams to streams as large as the upper Yellowstone River.

Food Habits
Merritt and Cummins (1996) report that members of this family are trophically shredder-detritivores; eating large particulate organic materials such as detritus, leaves and plants.

Ecology
Adults emerge from May to August (Gaufin et al., 1972).

Reproductive Characteristics
Adults emerge from May to August (Gaufin et al., 1972).

References
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Citation for data on this website:
Striped Sallfly — Triznaka signata.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from