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Montana Field Guides

Yellow Dotted Alpine - Erebia pawloskii
Other Names:  Theano Alpine, Erebia pawlowskii


Global Rank: G5
State Rank: SNR

Agency Status
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General Description
[From Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001] Forewing 1.7-2.1 cm. Small and dark brown. Both surfaces of forewing with postmedian band of rectangular red-orange spots (no black eyespots), a reddish patch in middle of wing; hindwing undersurface with 1 blurred cell spot and postmedian series of yellow-cream spots.

Phenology
One flight; mostly July in the north, mid-July to early August in the south, flying only every other year (Scott 1986). Mainly July to mid-August (Glassberg 2001). Early June through mid-August in the Rocky Mountain states (Ferris and Brown 1981), July in British Columbia (Guppy and Shepard 2001).

Diagnostic Characteristics
Best determined by both surfaces of forewing with postmedian band of rectangular red-orange spots (no black eyespots), a reddish patch in middle of wing; hindwing undersurface with 1 blurred cell spot and postmedian series of yellow-cream spots.

Species Range
Montana Range

Click the legend blocks above to view individual ranges.
 


Range Comments
Holarctic. In North America, fragmented and local populations in Alaska and Yukon, south in the Rocky Mountains through British Columbia to Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado; also along Hudson Bay in northern Manitoba (Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001); 3230 m to 3962 m elevation in Colorado (Brown 1957). In Montana, reported from three southern counties (Carbon, Park, Stillwater) near Wyoming (Kohler 1980; Stanford and Opler 1993), to at least 3048 m elevation (Ferris and Brown 1981). Locally uncommon (Glassberg 2001).

Migration
Non-migratory.

Habitat
Dry or moist tundra above or north of treeline, grassy areas, taiga, subalpine wet grassy meadows, spruce bogs (Ehrlich 1956; Oosting and Parshall 1978; Ferris and Brown 1981; Scott 1986; Opler and Wright 1999; Glassberg 2001; Guppy and Shepard 2001). Habitat in Montana not describe but probably alpine tundra and subalpine meadows (Ferris and Brown 1981).

Food Habits
Limited information. Larval food plants include Poa, possibly Carex, Festuca, and other grasses (Scott 1992). Adults feed on flower nectar, including Achillea, Antennaria, Astragalus, Epilobium, Oxytropis, Sedum, and Solidago (Oosting and Parshall 1978; Scott 1986, 2014).

Reproductive Characteristics
Limited information. Females lay eggs singly on dead blades of grass, sedge, rush near probable host plant, sometimes on willow (Scott 1986, 1992). Larvae eat leaves, build no nest. Biennial, hibernating first winter as young (L1 or L2 instar?) and second winter as nearly mature (L5 instar?) larvae (Scott 1979, 1986, 1992). Males perch and patrol slowly low above grassy swales, hillsides, bogs throughout the day in search of females (Scott 1975b, 1986).

References
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Citation for data on this website:
Yellow Dotted Alpine — Erebia pawloskii.  Montana Field Guide.  .  Retrieved on , from